Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

view dept. website http://www.houghton.edu/math/

Kristin A. Camenga, chair | Keith A. Horn, Associate Dean

585.567.9280
Overview

The mathematics major comprises coursework in mathematical concepts and computation with growing attention to the centrality of mathematical reasoning and proof. The major prepares students to work both collaboratively and independently and develops facility with both oral and written communication of mathematics. This combination of content, reasoning, and communication skills prepares students for a wide variety of vocations, including careers in education, industry, actuarial science, finance, computer science, health professions, and linguistics. Many students pursue advanced degrees in diverse areas such as mathematics, applied mathematics, education, architecture, law, health professions, and computer science. 

The computer science major emphasizes the theoretical foundations and application techniques for solving problems in today’s technological environment. The major prepares students to effectively use the technology of today and create the technology for tomorrow with a thorough understanding of a programming language and structures as well as foundations of computer architecture and networks. Throughout the major, emphasis is placed on the ability to apply understanding of fundamental concepts to solve problems. Students enter careers as programmers, software engineers, information technology as well as graduate school in a variety of computer-related disciplines.

Teaching Mathematics - Inclusive Childhood (elementary) or Adolescence (secondary). See Education.

Faculty
Kristin A. Camenga Wei Hu Jill E. Jordan Jun-Koo Park
Rebekah B. Johnson Yates
Courses
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COLP 401-402 Collaborative Performance

F&S-1, 2, 3, or 4

Preparation and presentation of joint performances in a variety of keyboard, instrumental, and vocal combinations.

COMP 101-102, 201-202, 301-302, 401-402 Composition

1, 2, 3, or 4-F&S

Original composition in various forms, genres, and styles.

CONC 401-402 Advanced Conducting, Choral

1, 2, 3, or 4-F&S

Preparation of material for a major choral ensemble and actual experience directing the ensemble. Prerequisites: MUS 229, 329, participation in ensemble, permission of ensemble director.

CONI 401-402 Advanced Conducting, Instrumental

1, 2, 3, or 4-F&S

Preparation of material for a major instrumental ensemble and actual experience directing the ensemble. Prerequisites: MUS 229, 430, participation in ensemble, and permission of ensemble director.

CSCI 115 Perspectives on Computing

4-WSP

An overview of how computers process, transmit, and store information. Designed for the non-major and includes many applications and issues found in contemporary culture. For example, privacy issues related to databases maintained by insurance companies or protection of intellectual property in light of increasingly popular file sharing applications. There are no prerequisites. This does not count toward a major or minor in computer science. Liberal Arts.

CSCI 211 Programming I

4-F

This course covers the fundamentals of object-oriented programming utilizing the Java programming language. This first programming course provides students with basic Java programming concepts, data types, operators, flow control statements, objects, classes, methods, arrays, strings, applications, applets, and graphics user interfaces. 2nd Science. Liberal Arts.

CSCI 214 Discrete Mathematics

2-F13

Topics include: sets, functions, relations (incl. Partial order), methods of propositional logic, introduction to predicate logic, counting, recurrence relations, asymptotic analysis, proof (incl. Induction), introduction to probability, and graphs. Liberal Arts.

CSCI 218 Programming II

4-S

This course extends the concepts learned in Programming I. It covers some advanced features of Java including advanced graphical user interfaces, exceptions, threads, graphics, multimedia, input/output, and networking. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: CSCI 211

CSCI 226 Computer Architecture

4-S14

Structure and internal organization of digital computers. Machine language and assembly language, representation of numbers, CPU organization, subroutines and linkage. Prerequisite: course listed below or equivalent proficiency. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: CSCI 211

CSCI 236 Data Structures and Algorithms

4-F14

This course covers the fundamental data structures of computer science and accompanying algorithms. Linked Lists, Stacks, Queues, Binary Trees, Priority Queues, Heaps and other ADTs will be included. Classical sorting and searching algorithms will be learned and implemented. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: CSCI 218

CSCI 245 Software Engineering

4-WSP

This course covers both a theoretical and a practical foundation in software engineering. In the theoretical part, it covers principles and methods of software engineering, including requirements, specification, design, implementation, testing, validation, operation, and maintenance. In the practical part, it covers the development of software products from an industry perspective, including generation of appropriate documents. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: CSCI 218

CSCI 295, 296; 395, 396; 495 Special Topics in Computer Science

1, 2, 3, or 4-WSP

Previous topics include: bioinformatics, computer security, neural networks, machine learning, C#, and NET. Liberal Arts.

CSCI 326 Operating Systems

4-WSP

A study of computer architecture at the register level. Management of the processor, memory, peripheral devices, and information. Interrelationships of architecture and operating systems. Performance evaluation. Exposure to system manager responsibilities in UNIX and Windows. Prerequisite: courses listed below or permission. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: CSCI 226 , CSCI 236

CSCI 328 Foundations of Computing

4-WSP

This course covers the introduction to the classical and contemporary theory of computation including regular, context-free, and computable (recursive) languages with finite state machines, pushdown automata, and Turing machines. It also covers the historical reasons and the need that gave rise to many different programming languages and discusses the features of the most successful and more influential of them. The similarities and the differences among procedural, functional, object-oriented logic as well as parallel programming languages will also be covered. Liberal Arts.

CSCI 336 Programming III

4-F13

This course covers J2EE (Java Enterprise Edition). The topics will include how to develop n-tier applications, design various application architectures based on the J2EE platform, and enterprise technologies - JDBC, RMI, JNDI, EJB, JMS, and JINI. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: CSCI 236

CSCI 340 Databases

4-F14

Introduction to relational databases. Fundamentals of database and query design. Database management topics include security, integrity, and concurrency techniques. Use of relational database software (including SQL) for application projects. Topics include decision-based and object-based databases. Exposure to database manager responsibilities. Prerequisite: course listed below or permission. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: CSCI 218

CSCI 391, 392; 491, 492 Independent Study

1, 2, 3, or 4-F, S

Liberal Arts.

CSCI 393 Summer Collaborative Research in Computer Science

1, 2, 3, or 4-Summer

Students work individually or in small teams reviewing literature, solving challenging problems in biology using machine learning and data mining algorithms and techniques from computer science, and describing their work in written form. The course focuses on interdisciplinary research which covers mathematics, statistics, computer science, and computational biology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. Liberal Arts.

CSCI 420 Networking

4-S15

An introduction to the basics of data communication and networking. Topics include the OSI model, physical processes used for digital transmission, standardization, local area networks, the network protocols, and network applications. Exposure to network manager responsibilities in UNIX and Windows NT. Prerequisite: course listed below or permission. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: CSCI 326

CSCI 480 Senior Capstone: Computer Science Seminar

4-S

For seniors, except by permission. Required of all computer science majors. Liberal Arts.

CSCI 496 Honors in Computer Science

4-

Liberal Arts.

INST 101, 102 Applied Lessons

1, 2, or 3-F&S

Normal level for introductory private study, non-majors. Permission of appropriate studio faculty. For voice: successful completion of MCLV II or permission. For piano: successful completion of MKBD IV or permission.

INST 201, 202 Applied Lessons

1, 2, or 3-F&S

Normal entering level for Bachelor of Arts, Composition, Music Education, and Bachelor of Music with Non-Music Elective Studies majors. Audition required, or prerequisite of INST 102 and permission of studio faculty.

INST 301, 302 Applied Lessons

1 - 6-F&S

Normal entering level for Performance majors; intermediate private study, Bachelor of Arts, Composition, Music Education, Bachelor of Music with Non-Music Elective Studies majors, minors, and elective study. Audition required, or INST 202 as prerequisite.

INST 401, 402 Applied Lessons

1 - 6-F&S

Advanced private study for BMus. majors. Prerequisite: INST 302 and successful Sophomore Review.

MATH 111 Math for the Liberal Arts

4-S

A survey course intended to introduce students to several ideas of mathematics, their historical context, and their applications and significance in society. The course will cultivate an appreciation of the significance of mathematics and develop student’s mathematical reasoning through selected topics in logic, set theory, probability, statistics, number theory, graph theory, the real number system, and problem solving. Creation: Math. Liberal Arts.

MATH 115 Fundamentals of Calculus

4-S

A problem-based approach to the basic ideas of calculus, beginning with a discussion of topics that precede calculus, including linear functions and polynomials. The calculus portion discusses velocity, tangent lines, and areas. Incorporates peer group work with a strong emphasis on graphing technology. With this course, students will become acquainted with calculus, the math that helped create the industrial revolution and is the driving force behind modern technology. This course is not intended to prepare students for Calculus I, but rather to expose students who do not need a rigorous course to the ideas of calculus. Creation: Math. Liberal Arts.

MATH 131 Principles of Statistics

4-F

This course introduces students to basic concepts and applications of probability theory and statistics. Students will learn how to collect, describe, understand, use, and interpret data in meaningful ways. Topics will include sampling procedure & bias, summary statistics, graphical displays, probability and probability distributions, statistical inference, correlation and linear regression. This course does not satisfy requirements for any major. Creation: Math. Liberal Arts.

MATH 181 Calculus I

4-F&S

A first semester of single variable calculus including limits, continuity, and the Intermediate Value Theorem; theory and computation of differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions with base e; applications of derivatives including optimization, curve-sketching, related rates, and the Mean Value Theorem, introduction to integration, including the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, computation of areas, and the technique of substitution. Creation: Math. Liberal Arts.

MATH 182 Calculus II

4-F&S

A second semester of single variable calculus including derivatives of all transcendental functions and L’Hospital’s rule; theory and techniques of integration including substitution, parts, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and improper integrals, applications of integrals including area, volume, arc length, and surface areas; sequences and series, including Maclaurin and Taylor series; basic calculus for parametric equations and polar coordinates. Creation: Math. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 181

MATH 210 Introduction to Proofs

2-F

Introduces the central idea of proof in mathematics and some standard proof formats that are used throughout the math major. The course includes propositional logic, an introduction to predicate logic, direct proof, proof by contradiction, and mathematical induction. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 181

MATH 214 Discrete Mathematics

2-F13

Introduction to discrete mathematical topics: equivalence relations, partial orders, functions, recurrence relations, counting, introduction to probability, graphs, and introduction to algorithm analysis. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 210

MATH 225 Multivariate Calculus

4-F13, S15

Space geometry, vectors, vector function, function of several variables, partial differentiation, multiple integration. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 182

MATH 241 Differential Equations

4-S14, F14

Methods of solution and applications of principle types of differential equations. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 182

MATH 261 Linear Algebra

4-S

Linear algebra: vector spaces, linear mappings, inner products and matrices. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 181

MATH 281 History of Mathematics

4-M14

A contextual study of the history of mathematics and some of the classical problems. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 182

MATH 295, 296; 395, 396; 495 Special Topics in Mathematics

1, 2, 3, or 4-

Previous topics include: graph theory; knot theory; number theory; linear algebra II. Liberal Arts.

MATH 325 Real Analysis I

4-S

This course develops a rigorous foundation for the fundamental topics covered in calculus: continuity, differentiability, integrability, and convergence based on limits and the axioms of the real number system. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 182 , MATH 210, MATH 261

MATH 331 Numerical Analysis

4-WSP

Representation of numeric data. Error analysis, mathematical basis, and limitations of techniques relating to selection of method. Topics: linear and nonlinear systems, curve fitting, numerical calculus, programming in MatLab. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 182 , MATH 261 , CSCI 211

MATH 333 Probability and Statistics I

4-F

This course introduces students to discrete and continuous probability, including conditional probability, random variables, independence, Bayes’ Theorem, expected value, variance, distributions, and the Central Limit Theorem. Using the probability covered in the first half of the semester, the course also covers some of the main topics of mathematical statistics, including statistical hypothesis testing, errors, correlation, regression equations, and analysis of variance. Co-requisites: MATH 210 and MATH 225. Liberal Arts.

MATH 341 Mathematical Modeling

2-S15

A course designed to develop an appreciation for and an understanding of the mathematics of complex systems. Particular problems from the life sciences and social sciences illustrate the principles and process of mathematical modeling and motivate the development of tools and techniques employed throughout applied mathematics. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 241

MATH 351 Modern Geometries

4-F14

A survey of geometry including advanced Euclidean geometry and an introduction to non-Euclidean geometries. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 182 , MATH 210

MATH 361 Abstract Algebra I

4-F

Groups and subgroups, rings and ideals, fields, homomorphisims, and isomorphisms. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 210, MATH 261

MATH 380 Mathematics Research Seminar

1-S

This course introduces students to the experience of mathematics research. Each student will be part of a team working with a faculty member on an open problem. This course may be repeated multiple times for credit.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 210

MATH 391, 392; 491, 492 Independent Study

1, 2, 3 or 4-

Liberal Arts.

MATH 393 Summer Collaborative Research in Mathematics

1, 2, 3, or 4-Summer

Summer research in collaboration with a mathematics faculty member, focusing on a current area of mathematical research. Students work intensively with a faculty member over the course of four weeks during the summer. Prerequisites will be according to the chosen area of research. Liberal Arts.

MATH 425 Real Analysis II

2-S14

This course covers selected topics from real and functional analysis, building on the foundation from Real Analysis I. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 325

MATH 433 Probability and Statistics II

2-S15

This course covers topics selected from parametric and non-parametric hypothesis testing, ANOVA, partial and multiple correlation methods, regression, curve fitting, and Monte Carlo simulation. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 333

MATH 452 Point Set Topology

4-WSP

Open and closed sets. Connected, compact, and metric topological spaces. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 261

MATH 461 Abstract Algebra II

2-S14

A continuation of material from Abstract Algebra I. Topics may include advanced group theory and ring theory, Sylow theorems, modules and vector spaces, Galois theory, and finite fields. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 361

MATH 471 Complex Analysis

4-WSP

Complex number system, limits, differentiation and integration in the complex plane, complex series. Prerequisites: courses listed below or permission. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MATH 225 , MATH 325

MATH 482 Senior Capstone: Mathematics Seminar

4-S

A capstone course which draws on many other courses. Emphases on formulating, solving, and explaining challenging problems in both verbal and written form. For seniors, except by permission. Liberal Arts.

MATH 496 Honors in Mathematics

4-

Liberal Arts.

MCHU 311 Historical Congregational Song

2-F13

Introductory history of hymnology from the early Christian Church to about 1950. An investigation of hymnic poetic and musical styles. Stress upon familiarity with the hymnal. When taken with MCHU 312 meets Culture: Art or Music. Liberal Arts.

MCHU 312 Recent Congregational Song

2-F13

Survey of diverse streams of Christian congregational song in English from about 1950 to the present time, including: songs of “hymn explosion”, songs of the liturgical renewal, Praise & Worship repertoire, and global song. Basic music-reading ability is expected. When taken with MCHU 311 meets Culture: Art or Music. Liberal Arts.

MCHU 451 Music and Worship

4-WSP

Music and liturgical practices in the history of the Christian Church and consideration of issues in contemporary worship practice in light of church history and Christian theology. Culture: Music. Liberal Arts.

MCHU 475 Service Playing, Piano

1-S

Development of keyboard skills with special application to piano playing in church service: melody harmonization and reharmonization, hymn playing and transposition, accompanying (solo and choral), extemporization in various styles. Permission of instructor. Required of piano majors and piano concentrations within music education curricula.

MCHU 476 Service Playing, Organ

2-S

Development of keyboard skills with special application to organ playing in church service: melody harmonization, bass realization, hymn playing and transposition, accompanying (solo and choral), extemporization in various styles. Permission of instructor. Required of organ majors and organ concentration within music education curricula.

MCLV I Class Voice I

1-F&S

Study of posture, breath control, tone production, and diction. Textbook used. Includes both group and individual singing of simple vocalises and songs in English. Hearing required. Six hours practice.

MCLV II Class Voice II

1-F&S

Continued study of basic vocal techniques. Emphasis on individual singing of vocalizes and songs in English. Introduction to Italian diction. Hearing required. Six hours practice.

MED 210 Field Experiences in Music Education

2-May

Students participate in three weeks of field experiences in high-need school districts working as teachers’ assistants and meet in a weekly seminar to discuss their experiences. Designed to fulfill the New York State field experience mandate; students earn 75-90 hours of field experience credit taken during freshmen or sophomore years. Students may opt to take EDUC 240, Teaching in Urban America, in lieu of this course. Taken concurrently with MED 211. (See Greatbatch School of Music Handbook for detailed explanation of Field Experience and other Certification requirements.)

MED 211 Workshop: Language Acquisition and Literacy Development

0-May

Introduces Music Education majors to foundational concepts surrounding language acquisition and literacy development, and provides resources for developing the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills of native English speakers and students who are English language learners. Taken concurrently with MED 210.

MED 214 Woodwind Instruments

1-F&S

Basic techniques of playing flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, and bassoon; acoustical, historical, and practical understanding of these instruments. Two hours class, two hours practice per week.

MED 215 Stringed Instruments

1-F&S

Basic techniques of playing violin, viola, ‘cello, and double bass; acoustical, historical, and practical understanding of these instruments. Two hours class, two hours practice per week.

MED 217 Brass Instruments

1-F&S

Class instruction in various brass instruments to acquaint music education majors with basic problems and teaching techniques of the brasses. Includes study on at least three brass instruments. Two hours class, two hours individual practice per week.

MED 218 Percussion Instruments

1-S

Snare drum, timpani basics, bass drum, mallet instruments, cymbals, smaller instruments of the battery; prepares music education majors to teach percussion instruments in public schools. Concentration on snare drum: coordination of hands; counting and playing rhythm. Two hours class, two hours individual practice per week.

MED 227 String Techniques

2-S

Preparation for teaching violin, viola, ‘cello, and double bass through the high school level. Development of playing and demonstration abilities. Survey of methods and materials. Two hours class, three hours practice.

Prerequisite Courses: MED 215

MED 240 Percussion Techniques

1-S

Preparation for teaching percussion instruments through high school level. Development of playing skills on timpani, mallet instruments, drums. Survey of percussion ensemble music and other materials. One class per week, three hours practice.

Prerequisite Courses: MED 218

MED 241 Brass Techniques

2-S

Preparation for teaching brass instruments through the high school level. Development of playing and demonstration abilities. Survey of methods and materials. Two hours class, three hours practice.

Prerequisite Courses: MED 217

MED 242 Woodwind Techniques

2-S

Preparation for teaching woodwind instruments through the high school level. Development of playing and demonstration abilities. Survey of methods and materials, two class hours, three hours of practice.

Prerequisite Courses: MED 214

MED 352 Secondary School Methods

2-S

Preparation for directing secondary school (grades seven-12) choral ensembles and for teaching secondary level general music and other non-performance music classes. Particular emphasis upon preparation to teach according to the New York State Learning Standards for the Arts.

MED 354 Instrumental Methods

2-S

Instrumental music program in public schools. Organization and training of school orchestras, bands, and instrumental classes; pedagogical methods of the standard band and orchestra instruments. Particular emphasis on preparation to teach by the New York State Learning Standards for the Arts.

MED 405 Student Teaching in Music

12-F

Practical experience teaching music in public schools. Two placements, six-to-seven weeks each, one on the elementary level (grades K-six), and one on the secondary level (grades seven-12). Criteria for approval: Completion of required professional education coursework as per emphasis, cumulative GPA of at least 2.70, documentation of at least 100 hours of field experience, and approval by the student teaching committee.

MED 419 Student Teaching Seminar

2-F

Seminar during and following student teaching dealing with effective teaching practices including problems of motivation, group management, curriculum development, and musical education goals.

MHS 222 Introduction to Film Music

3-WSP

History and aesthetics of music written for Hollywood films. Exploration of the sociology, philosophy, psychology, and technique of film music. Review of the elements of musical style with particular emphasis on their relation to the dramatic aspects of film. Written work emphasizing critical analysis of the use of music in various American film genres. Culture: Music. Liberal Arts.

MHS 231 Music History and Literature I

2-F

Development of music from earliest times through the Renaissance. Principles of listening and style analysis. Literature and style of various schools. Listening, examination of scores, performance, research reports, lectures, discussion. With MHS 232 satisfies Culture: Music. Liberal Arts.

MHS 232 Music History and Literature II

2-S

Continues MHS 231, from late Renaissance through Baroque (1750). With MHS 231 satisfies Culture: Music. Liberal Arts.

MHS 254 Music of World Cultures

3-WSP

Survey of Asian, Latin American, African, European music; listening experience, with research and analysis. Introduction to ethnomusicology to broaden student’s perspective. Recommended for those interested in mission field or intercultural relations. Culture: Music. Liberal Arts.

MHS 333 Music History and Literature III

3-F

Development of early classic through romantic music styles in cultural context. Principles of listening and style analysis. Introduction to basic bibliography and research. Principles of a Christian aesthetic. Culture: Music. Liberal Arts.

MHS 334 Music History and Literature IV

3-S

From late romantic through 20th century styles. Emphasis on individual research, writing, and class presentations. Evaluation of musical-cultural trends from a Christian perspective. Culture: Music. Liberal Arts.

MHS 490 Topics in Music History

3-F&S

Historical and analytical study of works from the topic chosen for each semester’s offering. Topics may include focused period surveys, specific composer studies, national or regional musics, specific major works, genre surveys, etc. Liberal Arts.

MKBD I Practical Keyboard I

1-F&S

Basic technique, rhythm, tone conception, articulation, fingering. Pentachord patterns, sight reading, transposition. Tetrachord scales. Simple I-V harmonization. Grade 1 repertoire.

MKBD II Practical Keyboard II

1-F&S

Basic work as in MKBD 110-111; pedaling and phrasing. Easier major scales, two rhythms, and arpeggios (hands separate). I-IV-V progressions and harmonization with simple accompaniments; IV7 by-ear chording. Grade 1 sight reading. Grade 2 repertoire.

MKBD III Practical Keyboard III

1-F&S

Easier major scales, hands together, two rhythms; easier arpeggios and minor scales, hands separate. Major/ minor primary triad patterns and harmonization, by-ear work with varied accompaniments. Grade 2 sight reading; simple improvisation; easy hymns. Grade 3 repertoire.

MKBD IV Practical Keyboard IV

1-F&S

Major/minor scales, arpeggios, triads; hands together. Major/minor progressions, harmonization; by-ear work using secondary chords and expanded accompaniments. Grade 2-1/2 sight reading; grade 3 transposition, improvisation; hymns, songs. Repertoire such as Bach short preludes and easy sonatinas.

MKBD V Practical Keyboard V

1-F&S

All major/minor scales and arpeggios, hands together, three rhythms. Progressions, harmonization; by-ear work using secondary chords and dominants in expanded patterns. Grade 3 sight reading; four-part transposition. Repertoire: easier Bach inventions, allegro sonatina movement.

MKBD VI Practical Keyboard VI

1-F&S

All scales and arpeggios, four rhythms. Harmonization and by-ear work with advanced chords and accompaniments. Hymns and patriotic songs in pianist styles with transposition. Choral (including open vocal score) and art song accompaniment. Grade 4 sight reading. Repertoire such as Bach inventions and easy classic sonatas.

MLT 113 Masterworks of Sight and Sound

3-WSP

Introduction of art and music from classic age to present; concert and gallery attendance included. Liberal Arts.

MLT 211 Music and Listening: An Introduction

3-F&S

Introduction to the study and enjoyment of classical masterpieces in music: recordings, outside biographical readings, reports on current musical events. Culture: Music. Liberal Arts.

MLT 450, 451, 452, 453 Brass, Woodwind, String and Percussion Literature

2-WSP

Survey of standard chamber, solo, and orchestral excerpt repertoire from the Baroque to the present. Emphasis on stylistic and interpretive traits, pedagogical issues and repertoire selection, major composers and representative works. Liberal Arts.

MLT 460 Vocal Literature

2-S

Survey of standard vocal repertoire from the High Baroque to the present. Emphasis on stylistic and interpretive traits, pedagogical issues and repertoire selection, major composers and representative works. Liberal Arts.

MLT 470 Organ Literature

2-WSP

An examination of the history of the development of the organ and its literature from the middle ages to the present. Examination of style and structure and their impact on performance. Liberal Arts.

MLT 480 Piano Literature

2-WSP

An examination of the history of the development of the piano and its literature, including music written for early keyboard instruments which today is accepted as part of the piano repertoire. Emphasis on 18th, 19th, and 20th century repertory. Examination of style and structure and their impact on performance. Chamber music with piano, concerti, solo piano literature. Liberal Arts.

MTH 225 Music Fundamentals Review (P/F)

0-F

Focused work in identification (aural and written) of intervals, scales, rhythms, chords and other basic materials of Western tonal music. A half-semester course offered online as a co-requisite of MTH 226.

MTH 226 Music Theory and Aural Skills I

4-F

Exploration of the foundational aspects of music in the context of the Western tonal musical repertoire. Emphasis on sight-singing, dictation and improvisation. Five class hours per week plus independent computer- and tutor-assisted instruction. Introduction to music-notation software programs. Co-requisite: MTH 225 or permission of instructor. Satisfies Culture: Music. Liberal Arts.

MTH 227 Music Theory II

3-S

Analysis, composition and basic arranging work using Western tonal harmony through secondary dominants. Continued development of music-notation software skills. Prerequisite: MTH 226 or permission of instructor. . Co-requisite: MTH 228 or permission of instructor. Liberal Arts.

MTH 228 Aural Skills II

1-S

Work in tonal sight-singing, ear training and dictation, through secondary dominants. Two class hours per week plus independent computer- and tutor-assisted instruction. Continued development of software skills. Co-requisite: MTH 227 or permission of instructor. Liberal Arts.

MTH 325 Music Theory III

3-F

Continuing analysis, composition and arranging work using Western tonal harmony through advanced chromaticism and eighteenth-century counterpoint. Continued development of software skills. Prerequisite: MTH 227; Co-requisite: MTH 326 or permission of instructor. Liberal Arts.

MTH 326 Aural Skills III

1-F

Continuing work in tonal sight-singing, ear training and dictation, through advanced chromaticism. Two class hours per week plus independent computer- and tutor-assisted instruction. Continued development of software skills. Co-requisite: MTH 325 or permission of instructor. Liberal Arts.

MTH 327 Music Theory IV

3-S

Western music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries along with relevant materials from selected world music traditions. Development of analytical, compositional and arranging skills using these materials. Continued development of software skills. Co-requisite: MTH 328. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MTH 325

MTH 328 Aural Skills IV

1-S

Development of sight-singing, aural, and improvisational skills involving the music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries along with relevant materials from selected world music traditions. Two class hours per week plus independent computer- and tutor-assisted instruction. Continued development of software skills. Co-requisite: MTH 327 or permission of instructor.

MTH 367 Advanced Global Musicianship

2-F&S

Capstone course of the theory sequence: Analysis, improvisation, composition, arranging and performance in a variety of Western, world and integrative musical idioms. Emphasis on structures and processes. Liberal Arts.

Prerequisite Courses: MTH 327

MTH 458 Sixteenth Century Counterpoint

3-WSP

A study of the principles of counterpoint in western music with an emphasis on models from 16th century vocal polyphony. Analysis of repertoire, original compositions. Prerequisite: MTH 326 or permission. Liberal Arts.

MTH 463 Form and Analysis

3-WSP

Structural and harmonic analysis of musical form through simple and compound song form, variation, rondo, sonata forms. Contrapuntal forms of the invention, chorale prelude, fugue, canon. Study of the analysis techniques of Schenker, La Rue, and others. Liberal Arts.

MUS 180-182 Practicum in Sound and Recording

0 or 1-F/S

Hands-on training and operational experience in principles and practices of live sound and recording events for Houghton College, Greatbatch School of Music. Emphasis on proper procedures and best practices in real-world work environment. Co-requisite: employment as student worker for Live Sound and Recording Services. Can be repeated; must be taken for credit in first semester. By permission of instructor.

MUS 191, 291, 391, 491 Independent Study

1, 2, or 3-WSP

MUS 207 Introduction to Pro Tools

3-F

Introduction to Pro Tools sound & recording software. Foundational skills necessary to record, edit, and mix at basic level using a Digidesign Pro Tools system. Focus: fundamental tools and techniques through demonstrations, real-world examples, and frequent hands-on assignments. Successful completion prepares student to undertake Pro Tools 101 Digidesign Certification exam. This course has a fee. By permission of instructor.

MUS 208 Pro Tools Production I

3-S

Continued study of Pro Tools: expanding range of tools and techniques. Focus: expanded hardware and soft-ware configurations, developing versatile tools for manipulating and editing both audio and MIDI data, and implementing various techniques to facilitate larger and more sophisticated mixing scenarios, again through real-world examples and frequent hands-on assignments that will enhance your capabilities in all aspects of Pro Tools production. Successful completion prepares student to undertake Pro Tools 110 DigiDesign Certification exam. This course has a fee.

Prerequisite Courses: MUS 207

MUS 222- 224 Jazz Workshop (Houghton Jazz)

0 or 1-F&S

Preparation and presentation of a variety of jazz repertoire including swing, combo, and modern styles. Permission of director.

MUS 226 Flute Ensemble

0 or 1-F&S

Preparation and presentation of repertoire for flute ensemble. Permission of director.

MUS 226 Flute Ensemble

0 or 1-F&S

Preparation and presentation of repertoire for flute ensemble. Permission of director.

MUS 229 Basic Conducting

2-F&S

Basic conducting, rhythmic development, baton technique, three hours per week.

Prerequisite Courses: MTH 225

MUS 250 Music in Christian Perspective: An Introduction

2-F

Introduction to music studies in the context of Christian worldview. Examination of Biblical, philosophical, and scientific bases for human creativity. Discussion of music’s role in society and in the liberal arts context. Orientation to college-level work in music, including diagnostic examination of background knowledge. Liberal Arts.

MUS 255 Brass Ensemble

0 or 1-F&S

Preparation and presentation of repertoire for brass ensemble. Permission of director.

MUS 310-314 Men’s Choir

0 or 1-F&S

Major ensemble. Audition required. By permission of the director.

MUS 315-319 Women’s Choir

0 or 1-F&S

Major ensemble. Audition required. By permission of the director.

MUS 320-24 College Choir

0 or 1-F; 0, 1 or 2-S

Major ensemble. Audition required. Ensemble is available for 2 credits in any semester wherein ensemble tours. By permission of the director.

MUS 329 Choral Conducting

2-S

Elements of choral conducting; training of choirs; rehearsal techniques; preparation of choral scores. Three hours per week.

Prerequisite Courses: MUS 229

MUS 330 Keyboard Skills

2-F or S

Functional piano class required of piano and organ majors and concentrations within music education curricula. Emphases: sight reading, harmonization, transposition, accompaniment, score reading, improvisation. Jury exam. Six hours weekly practice. Prerequisite: Piano level 237.

MUS 331-335 Philharmonia (Orchestra)

0 or 1-F&S

Major ensemble. Audition required. By permission of the director.

MUS 336-340 Symphonic Winds

0 or 1-F; 0, 1 or 2-S

Major ensemble. Audition required. Ensemble is available for 2 credits in any semester wherein ensemble tours. By permission of the director.

MUS 353 Lyric Theater

0 or 1-S

Preparation and presentation of operatic, musical theater, and operetta scenes and complete works from the standard repertoire. Typical four-year cycle will comprise one full opera, one full musical or operetta, one bill of one-acts or acts from major works, and one scenes production. Study of techniques of stage movement and stagecraft. Three hours in rehearsal per week; outside rehearsal required. Permission of director.

MUS 356 Voice Pedagogy

2-S15

Methods of voice production and development as preparation for teaching; emphases on teaching and evaluation. Attention to proper selection of music. Two class hours per week; junior and senior year.

MUS 395 Special Topics

1, 2, or 3-WSP

MUS 430 Instrumental Conducting

2-S

Conducting laboratory band or orchestra; methods of presenting band and orchestral materials. One and one-half hours with laboratory band or orchestra per week.

Prerequisite Courses: MUS 229

MUS 447 Piano Ensemble

0 or 1-F&S

Performance of keyboard ensemble repertoire, Renaissance to 20th century. Duet and multi-piano literature. Emphasis on style and special ensemble problems. Fulfills ensemble requirement for junior and senior applied piano (performance) majors. Four hours outside practice.

MUS 455 Chamber Singers

0 or 1-F

Practical experience singing in a small group of 12 to 16 performers. Three hours in rehearsal per week. Permission of director.

MUS 457 Chamber Ensembles

0 or 1-F&S

Ensembles organized to include interested students. Small groups rehearse three hours per week. Standard literature for handbells, percussion, strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, guitar, etc., is studied with a view toward public performance during the year. Permission of appropriate ensemble director.

MUS 470 Organ Pedagogy

2-WSP

Examination of teaching methods, materials, and technical approaches for the organ. Guided teaching in private and class settings. Required for organ performance majors.

MUS 477 Piano Pedagogy

3-S

Preparation for teaching beginning & intermediate piano students. Study of beginning & intermediate piano methods and literature, including adult and preschool materials. Survey of professional organizations and publications for the private piano teacher and a study of the writings and teaching ideals of great piano pedagogues. Guidelines for development and maintenance of private piano studio. Practicum for teaching community students with presentation of a public recital at the end of the semester.

MUS 495 Internship

3, 4, 5, or 6-WSP

PERF 385 Junior Recital

0-F&S

PERF 485 Senior Capstone: Senior Recital

0-F&S

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