A Christian College of the Liberal Arts & Sciences

Science & Math Colloquium

November 12, 2013 | 11:45 AM to 12:35 PM

Using Diffuse Light to Monitor Cancer Therapy Non-invasively

Dr. Regine Choe, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester Medical Center

Abstract: Photons in the near-infrared spectral window (650 - 950 nm) can travel deep in tissue due to the relatively small absorption due to chromophores such as oxygenated, deoxygenated hemoglobins, water and lipids. However, photons are scattered multiple times within tissue before they are absorbed or detected at the surface. By modeling how photons move through tissue with the photon diffusion equation, one can separate absorption and scattering effects, and quantify chromophore concentrations, along with blood flow. These physiological parameters have great potential to improve diagnosis and assess whether treatments are effective for breast cancer, which is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. In addition, the use of non-ionizing radiation and technologically simple, fast, inexpensive instrumentation makes diffuse optical tomography and spectroscopy attractive for clinical applications.

In this presentation, clinical/preclinical research tools and approaches to test whether diffuse optics can predict treatment effectiveness will be introduced. In addition, the future research directions exploring different cancer therapies and new metabolic parameters using novel imaging agents will be discussed.

Location:
South End Dining Room
Categories:
Science & Math Colloquium