Rebecca Williams

Assistant Professor of Biology

  • (585) 567-9293 ext #2930
  • Paine 319
  • Biology
Send Me An Email

  • (585) 567-9293 ext #2930
  • Paine 319
  • Biology
Send Me An Email

https://www.instagram.com/williams_et.al/

Education

  • PhD - University of Windsor
  • BEd - University of Windsor
  • BSc - University of Windsor

Courses Taught

  • General Biology I (BIOL 151)
  • Genetics (BIOL 251)
  • Cancer Cell Biology (BIOL 395)
  • Fundamentals of Biology (BIOL 103)
  • Embryology & Endocrinology (BIOL 382)
  • Collaborative Research (BIOL 394)
  • Senior Capstone in Biology (BIOL 482)

Research Interests

My primary research interests involve the use of bottom dwelling fish as bioindicators of pollution that persist in aquatic bodies of water.

Specifically, we use the CYP1A gene as a marker of pollution. The expression of CYP1A is induced when cells are exposed to toxins, making it a useful indicator of pollution. Fish that are in direct contact with sediment, where toxins are concentrated, can be used to monitor CYP1A expression and thus, levels of pollution.

Previously, I explored CYP1A expression in the brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the Great Lakes.

Currently, we are using freshwater fish of western New York to monitor pollution levels of major bodies of water in the area.

Publications

Williams, R. Hubberstey, A.H. (2014). Benzo(a)pyrene exposure causes adaptive changes in p53 and CYP1A gene expression in Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus). Aquatic Toxicology.

Williams, R. and Hubberstey, A. (2014). Contaminated Sediment in the Detroit River Selects for Evolved CYP1A and p53 responses in Wild Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) populations, In progress.

Koetsier, T., Miller, K., Taggart, T. (2016). Measuring CYP1A in freshwater fish of western New York as an indicator of pollution levels, In progress.

Presentations

Williams, R. and Hubberstey, A. (2011). Quantification of Genetic and Cellular Changes in the Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) Exposed to Environmental Toxins. Poster presented at the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, November 13-17th, Boston, MA.

Williams, R. (2013). Great Lakes Undercover: Can Fish Evolve to Survive Pollution? 3MT (Three Minute Thesis) Competition, University of Windsor Runner-Up.

Williams, R. (2013). Great Lakes Undercover: Can Fish Evolve to Survive Pollution? 3MT (Three Minute Thesis) Provincial Participant at Queen’s University.

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