A Christian College of the Liberal Arts & Sciences

Courses

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Topics in Leadership and Vocation (5-week module)

3-

The course introduces concepts for Christian responsibility and involvement in public issues important to your internship. It asks what it means for you to "enact" your vocation by living out the truth of your convictions in "real life." By focusing on a public topic salient to your internship placement, you learn to use (1) basic techniques for issue analysis and (2) the narrative pattern of the Bible (creation, fall, redemption, consummation) as an analytical framework. Reflecting on the responsibilities, challenges and opportunities that arise from your internship experience, attention is given both to the larger Biblical narrative and to your own unique story, identity and gifting. Unlike other 5-week ASP modular courses, this course stresses interaction with your internship placement and extends across the semester, beginning with the term's first two weeks, involving a week at midterm and concluding with the term's last two weeks.

Internship Placement: (14-week part-time work)

6-

This course is an internship placement that continues across the semester. You must work a minimum average of 20 hours a week for a minimum of 13 weeks to receive 6 semester hours of credit. Although ASP has placed students in hundreds of agencies and offices throughout the greater Washington metropolitan area, each internship placement is designed with you in mind. Your position and duties are arranged through a careful process involving ASP, the sponsoring agency and you. You receive academic credit for this course so you cannot be paid for your work. Your internship is carefully monitored by ASP faculty. Faculty monitors confer with you and your on-site supervisor. Your faculty monitor also visits your internship site at least once during the term. To successfully complete an internship, you are required to (1) submit three reflection essays on your experiences & observations, (2) get "the big picture" surrounding your placement by attending events around the city, and (3) read and reflect on an internship text.

Professional Mentorship (optional): (4 mentor meetings)

1-

This optional course gives you the opportunity to meet with a professional mentor in your field four times during the semester. You submit four recorded individual oral reflections to your faculty monitor, one following each of the four professional mentor meetings, and one recorded group oral reflection to your faculty monitor at the conclusion of the semester. Your oral reflections (1) demonstrate an effort to learn from your mentor's experience and background to clarify your career aspirations and emerging vocational vision and (2) draw upon a biography or novel (chosen by your mentor) to wrestle with questions, insights and implications raised by the text for your internship and life experience and for your developing sense of call.

Policy Analysis & Advocacy Seminar

3-

Provides a detailed survey of the public policy issue of international migration. Migrants may be forced or voluntary travelers; legal or illegal sojourners; temporary or permanent residents. The one constant is that international migration patterns always carry important political implications for both the sending and receiving countries. Its study provides opportunity for learners to address critical questions pertaining to contemporary citizenship, democratic practice, equality, freedom, globalization, and liberalism. Course is part of the Public Policy Initiatives Track.

Public Policy Project

3-

Students are involved in proposing, researching and planning a public policy project. Course is part of the Public Policy Initiatives Track.

Entrepreneurship & Human Development Seminar

3-

Provides students with a detailed introduction to the unique community of partnerships emerging in Washington, D.C. among commercial, governmental, and non-governmental organizations. ASP faculty and guest practitioners provide a comparative analysis of different approaches to the design and management of these types of collaborations as they pertain to the global development issue of hunger/food security. As part of their analysis, students are required to reflect on the biblical demands of justice as they pertain to food security, and how these demands ought to be translated across the different institutional roles and responsibilities that comprise these partnerships. Course is part of the Global Development Track.

Global Development Partnership Exercise

3-

Students will propose, research and present a project for a relief and development organization. Course is part of the Global Development Track.

Chinese I

2-3-

Required Course for program. This course in introductory Chinese focuses on acquiring survival fluency in spoken and written Chinese. The emphasis is on the spoken form of Mandarin Chinese, the national language of China. Students who already have studied Chinese may apply for a more advanced class. All students take the written exams for Chinese characters, vocabulary and grammar of the CSP Chinese I course.

Chinese History

3-

Required course for program. One-third of this seminar course consists of lectures, one-third consists of presentations by the students, and one-third consists of field trips to historical sites. The course covers the history of China from its earliest beginnings up to the present. Students become familiar with the major dynasties of China, their character and contributions, and their major figures. On a study tour to Xi’an, Beijing, and Shanghai, students visit many of the most famous Chinese sites of historical importance, including the Terra Cotta Soldiers, the Forbidden City, the Great Wall, the temple of Heaven, the Shanghai Museum, and much more. Each student will also read and make a presentation on a book about one significant event or person in Chinese history, such as the Boxer rebellion, the Mongol empire, the international voyages or the Ming Dynasty, Matteo Ricci, etc. Possible credit: history, cross-cultural studies.

Intercultural Communication

3-

Required course for program. This course covers issues intended to help students understand and adjust to Chinese culture. The focus will be on how our students demonstrate their beliefs in their daily lives within the context of China. Topics include culture and basic values; culture shock, introductory linguistics, contextualization and factors involved in successful cross-cultural interaction. Well-known films featuring famous actors (both Western and Chinese) that focus on cross-cultural experiences will be shown and discussed each week. Possible credit: sociology, cross-cultural studies, communication, linguistics.

Contemporary Society: Public Policy & Economic Development

3-

Required course for program. This required course examines two key and inter-related aspects of modern China: government policy and economic reforms. Public Policy covers the structure of the Chinese government, social rights and the legal system, and issues such as ethnic minorities, family planning and education. Economic development focuses on the government policies from 1949 to present, from the commune system to the current market-oriented reforms. Other topics include foreign investment, pollutions and the environment, and the World Trade Organization. Each student will present an investigative report based on interviews with Chinese about a topic relating to contemporary Chinese society that is of particular interest to Americans. All students will also prepare a marketing paper in which they describe and analyze the ways an American or international company markets its products or its franchise in China. The goal of this course is for students to learn about China by seeking out informed Chinese themselves. Possible credit: political science, cross-cultural studies, sociology, history, business and economics.

Chinese II

3-

Elective course for China Studies Concentration. This course focuses on acquiring low-intermediate fluency in spoken and written Chinese so that a student can handle situations such as travel planning, illness, making appointments, etc. The emphasis is on the spoken form of Mandarin Chinese, the national language of China. There will also be lectures on Chinese dialects, simplified v. traditional characters and word radicals.

Eastern Philosophy and Religions

3-

Elective course for China Studies Concentration. This course introduces the teachings, history, and development of Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and folk religion as well as their role in China today. Other topics covered are the I Ching, Yin and Yang, the Five Phases and the widely varying ways the gospel has been introduced into China over the last 15 centuries. The course will also examine these topics from a Christian perspective, seeing to what extent they might relate to Christian doctrine. Field trips to relevant sites will occur throughout the program.

Dimensions of East Asian Culture

3-

Elective course for China Studies Concentration. May choose this course or Chinese Painting and/or Tai Chi. This elective course introduces students to Chinese visual, physical, medical and culinary arts. Each component consists primarily of hands-on practice. Students will also have several lectures on the unifying Chinese philosophy that underlies these dimensions of Chinese culture.

Chinese Painting

1-

Elective course for China Studies Concentration. May choose this course and/or Tai Chi or Dimensions. Students will learn to paint from a Chinese artist. They will practice the basics of Chinese water-based brush-work, painting traditional pictures of bamboo, flowers, etc.

Tai Chi

1-

Elective course for China Studies Concentration. May choose this course and/or Chinese Painting or Dimensions. This physical education course emphasizes the traditional Chinese forms of stylized self-defense, which tones the body and concentrates the mind. Exercises may focus on either the gentler form of tai chi, or on the more vigorous wu shu, depending on who is teaching that semester.

International Business in China

3-

Required course for Business Concentration. In this course, students hear talks presented by Christians who have done business in China for years. The talks cover issues such as fair and ethical business practices and the factors involved in out-sourcing jobs to China. Additionally, students write responses to assigned readings from the course text, engage in frank discussions with the Internship Coordinator about what to expect and how to deal with business in China and meet with business leaders in Shanghai. Finally, these students prepare a group “end-of-semester” presentation for the rest of the CSP students highlighting what they have learned.

Business Internship

3-

Required course for Business Concentration. The Internship Coordinator will make every attempt to place students in job placements that will provide meaningful work experience for the three-week internships, working full-time (40+hrs/week) for either Western or Chinese companies. Currently, nearly all of these internship placements are in Xiamen city.

Faith, Music and Culture

3-

Required core course. The purpose of this course is to help students develop a Christian approach to the creation, marketing and consumption of contemporary music. While engaging in studies of theory, history and criticism, students explore the concept of culture as well as the nature of popular culture and examine popular art and music in contemporary aesthetic, social, cultural and industrial contexts. Additional topics include a study of the role of popular music in cultural communication, the development of a Christian critical method and an examination of different Christian approaches to popular art and culture.

Inside the Music Industry

3-

Required core course. Through readings, lectures and seminars, this course provides up-to-the-minute insight into the inner workings of the music industry. Emphasis will be given to career possibilities and gifts and skills required to succeed in each of the major areas, including work as a performer, songwriter, record producer and engineer, etc. Students gain an understanding of the structure and methodologies of a typical U.S. record company, including A&R, marketing, radio promotion, public relations, sales & distribution, product development, art, manufacturing and business affairs.

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