A Christian College of the Liberal Arts & Sciences

Department of History and Political Science

view dept. website http://www.houghton.edu/catalog/departments/34/

Peter C. Meilaender, chair | Paul D. Young, Associate Dean

585.567.9440
Overview

The history major involves a strong liberal arts concentration. The major provides excellent background for careers in law, the ministry, public administration, government service, college and secondary teaching, business, foreign service, and preparation for archivists, museum curators, historic site specialists, librarians, editors, and writers.

The political science major helps students develop an understanding of politics that integrates four elements: a grasp of fundamental theoretical concepts and problems of political life; an understanding of how those concepts and problems shape and inform the domestic politics of the United States; an understanding of how those concepts and problems shape and inform the world of international relations; and finally a sense of how our understanding of those same concepts and problems is enriched by the comparative analysis of different countries and political systems. In all of these ways, the major helps prepare students for responsible citizenship. It is helpful to students contemplating careers in teaching, government, law, diplomacy, international service, business, and journalism.

Teaching History – Inclusive Childhood (Elementary) or Adolescence (Secondary) Education: See Education section in this catalog.

Faculty
A. Cameron Airhart William R. Doezema David A. HowardPeter C. Meilaender
Ronald J. Oakerson Meic Pearse
Courses
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HIST 101 Western Civilization I: Ancient Civilization to 1650

2-F&S

Survey of western civilization from its cultural roots in ancient Near Eastern, Greek and Roman civilizations through its development during the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Reformation, and age of discovery and expansion. Attention to analyzing primary source materials. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 102 Western Civilization II: 1650 to the Present

2-F&S

Survey of western civilization from the rise of science, the Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, nationalism and other ideologies, two World Wars, the Cold War and beyond. Attention to analyzing primary source materials. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 103 Western Civilization: Science Honors I

2-F

Survey of western civilization from its cultural roots in ancient Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman civilizations, including the rise of early science, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Reformation, and the age of discovery and expansion. Attention to analyzing primary source materials. Reserved for first-year Science Honors students. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 104 Western Civilization: Science Honors II

2-S

Survey of western civilization from the rise of modern science, the Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, nationalism and other ideologies, two World Wars, the Cold War and beyond. Attention to analyzing primary source materials. Reserved for first-year Science Honors students. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 105 Western Civilization: Ancient Civilization to the Present

4-F&S

Survey of Western civilization from its cultural roots in ancient Near eastern, Greek and Roman civilizations through its development during the Middle Ages, Renaissance, reformation, the age of discovery and expansion, the rise of science, the Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, nationalism and other ideologies, two World Wars, the Cold War, and post-Cold War culture. Attention to analyzing primary source materials. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 126 New York State History

4-WSP

This course surveys the Empire State’s history from the Colonial period through the present. The state’s history is explored in its own right, but attention is also given to showing how New York state in many respects has been a notable microcosm for broader Colonial and national developments. Liberal Arts.

HIST 191, 192; 291, 292; 391, 392; 491, 492 Independent Study

1, 2, or 4-WSP

Liberal Arts.

HIST 220 American History Survey

4-F

Overview of American history to the present. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 223 Latin American History to 1800

4-S

An introductory survey, with attention to cultural interaction during the colonial period. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 224 Latin American History since 1800

4-F

An introductory survey of Latin America from the revolutionary era to the present. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 230 Medieval Europe

4-F&S

A survey of European history and culture that begins with the transition from Roman civilization and ends with the cultural changes that resulted in the Reformation. Particular emphasis is given to the themes of western cultural formation, ecclesiastical development, monastic and lay spirituality, and the birth of fundamental western institutions. Primarily a reading course, primary sources are heavily relied upon. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 249 African History

4-F

Sub-Saharan Africa from earliest times. Medieval empires of western Sudan, colonial rule, emergence of national states. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 295, 395, 495 i Special Topics (CDRP, see Foreign Languages)

4-WSP

Group study of selected topics; open only by permission. Liberal Arts.

HIST 325 Europe in the 19th Century (CDRP, see World Languages)

4-F

Growth of liberal democracy, influence of industrial revolution and impact of nationalism. French Revolution to 1890. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 326 Europe, 1890-1945

4-F

The changing intellectual climate, World War I, problems of inter-war period, challenges to democracy, background of World War II. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 332 History of Rome

4-F

Survey of Roman history and cultures from the beginning of the republic until the disintegration of the empire, emphasizing political and religious developments. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 341 Conceptualizing the City: An Exploration of the City in Western Culture

4-6-F&S

Explores the history of cities and the ideas that have shaped both their objective development – in terms of their material culture, their economic base, and their political structure – and our subjective experience of them. Also considers social science explanations of urban development (why cities?), 20th century trends (suburbanization, metropolitanization) and reactions to them, and ponders the future of cities in the 21st century. Reading ranges over works of history, philosophy, literary fiction, and social science. Throughout, connections to the Buffalo experience provide concrete (sometimes literally concrete) illustrations of ideas and their effects. Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

HIST 347 The Balkans and Eastern Europe: Early Middle Ages to Present

4-WSP

A survey of the history of Balkan and Eastern European history with special emphasis upon the interactions of Catholic, Orthodox, and Muslim cultures; ethnic and religious diversity; the fraught relationship with western Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment ideas; and mutually exclusive nationalist interpretations. Houghton Balkans Semester Program.

HIST 355* East Asia: History and Politics

4-WSP

Introduction to history and politics of East Asia from ancient time to present, with focus on China and Japan. Emphasis on historical and political developments in 19th and 20th centuries leading to founding of Communist China and new Japan. Liberal Arts.

HIST 359 Colonial America, 1600-1788

4-F

Settlement of North America with emphases upon religious and social developments as well as upon the American Revolution. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 360 Early National Period, 1788-1850

4-S

Establishment of national political institutions and ideologies. Manifest Destiny, institution of slavery, ante-bellum revivalism and reforms, nascent industrialization. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 361 Civil War and Industrial America, 1850-1920

4-F

Sectionalism and Civil War, Reconstruction, adaptation to accelerating industrialization and urbanization, and World War I. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 362 Recent American History, 1920 to Present

4-S

Immigration, Depression and New Deal, World War II, Cold War, and resurgence of Evangelicalism. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 368 The Reformation

4-WSP

A survey of the continental, English, and Roman Catholic reformation of the 16th century. Liberal Arts.

HIST 368 The Reformation

4-WSP

A survey of the continental, English, and Roman Catholic reformation of the 16th century. Culture: History. Liberal Arts.

HIST 370 Evangelical Roots

4-F

Looks at Evangelicalism from the 1730s to the present, especially in Britain and America, where most of the movements originated and developed. However, attention is also paid to developments elsewhere, especially in recent decades, when African, Asian and Latin American churches have begun not merely to grow, but to foster innovations of their own, with wider effects. Liberal Arts.

HIST 371 Religion, Fascism, and Communism in 20th Century Europe

4-WSP

Looks at the interaction between Christianity and the churches (evangelical, Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox) on one hand, and the totalitarian ideologies and regimes of twentieth-century Europe on the other. In the process, such ideas as nationhood, class, modernization and secularization are considered, along with their implications for Christian belief and practice, and the various possible, and actual, Christian responses to them. Liberal Arts.

HIST 381 Historiography

4-WSP

History of historical writings and methods; theories of history. Liberal Arts.

HIST 481 Senior Capstone: Senior History Seminar

4-S

Each student will work with a departmental faculty member to develop or revise a research paper into a substantial historical article. Required for the history major. Liberal Arts.

HIST 496 Honors in History

4-WSP

Liberal Arts.

POLS 191, 291, 391, 491 Independent Study

1, 2, 3, or 4-WSP

Liberal Arts.

POLS 205 In Search of Justice

4-F/S

How do we do justice and avoid injustice through political activity? We explore the possibilities and pitfalls of the search for justice by considering classic theories of justice, studying citizen action and the policy process, and examining case studies of specific issues such as health care, same-sex marriage, human trafficking, or other issues of current concern. Community: Political Science. Liberal Arts.

POLS 212 Social Science Research Methods

4-S

Basic scientific method, application to social phenomena; procedures and methodological problems in various types of social research; methods of data analysis. Liberal Arts.

POLS 220 The American Political System

4-S

The foundation course in American politics. Focuses on the basic design of the American political system, including constitutionalism, federalism, and the separation of powers, with special attention to the Founding principles as explained in the Federalist. Additional topics can include political parties, elections, Congress and the President, bureaucracy, the judiciary, and state and local government. Liberal Arts.

POLS 227 Governing Rural Communities

4-WSP

A study of local governance and politics in a rural context, exploring town, county, and regional perspectives with an emphasis on policy analysis and civic engagement. Includes a fieldwork component combining research and service learning. Liberal Arts.

POLS 240 Comparing Nations

4-WSP

Comparative basis for understanding similarities and differences in political systems around the world, focusing on Europe and Asia. Typical issues: historical development, ideology, political parties, interest groups, government, and domestic and foreign issues. Liberal Arts.

POLS 260 Introduction to Political Thought

4-F

Introduces students to the tradition of Western political thought from the ancient to the modern world through a close reading of important thinkers. By considering problems of community, obligation, order, justice, liberty, and freedom, the course equips students for careful normative reflection on public life. Liberal Arts.

POLS 270 Introduction to Public Policy

4-WSP

An introduction to the nature of public problems and the diverse ways in which governments respond. Includes concepts and methods of policy analysis, legal instruments of public policy, legislation and its implementation, the work of public agencies at various levels of government, and the role of the courts in the policy process. Illustrated by cases drawn from a range of policy areas, such as the environment, education, health-care, transportation, and housing. Liberal Arts.

POLS 295, 395, 495 Special Topics in Political Science

4-WSP

According to demand and interest, courses will be offered on a range of topics in any area of political science. Liberal Arts.

POLS 295H ST: East Meets West Honors Political Science

3-F13

Completion of the political science component of the 2012-2013 East Meets West program; reserved for students in that program. Prerequisite: INTS 153 (spring/Mayterm). Community: Political Science. Liberal Arts.

POLS 322 Philosophy of Law

2-F or S

Introduction to fundamental issues surrounding the concept of law, such as the debate between natural law theorists (who maintain that there is a law above human law) and legal positivists (who deny this), as well as issues such as punishment and the basis of the legitimacy of legislative authority. Liberal Arts.

POLS 325 Executive Power and the Presidency

4-WSP

Careful study of the nature of executive power and its embodiment in the American presidency. Focuses on the executive's role in our constitutional order and changes in that role over the course of America's political development. Liberal Arts.

POLS 328 Governing Urban Communities

4-WSP

A study of local governance and politics in an urban context, exploring neighborhood, citywide, and metropolitan levels of organization with an emphasis on policy analysis and civic engagement. Includes a fieldwork component in Buffalo combining research and service learning. This course has a fee. Liberal Arts.

POLS 336 American Foreign Policy

4-WSP

Formulation and execution of U.S. foreign policy, especially since WWII. Special attention to foreign policy strategies in light of different conceptions of vital interests, threats to these interests, and appropriate responses. Liberal Arts.

POLS 341 Conceptualizing the City: An Exploration of the City in Western Culture

4-6-F&S

Explores the history of cities and the ideas that have shaped both their objective development – in terms of their material culture, their economic base, and their political structure – and our subjective experience of them. Also considers social science explanations of urban development (why cities?), 20th century trends (suburbanization, metropolitanization) and reactions to them, and ponders the future of cities in the 21st century. Reading ranges over works of history, philosophy, literary fiction, and social science. Throughout, connections to the Buffalo experience provide concrete (sometimes literally concrete) illustrations of ideas and their effects. Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

POLS 342 The European Union: Politics and Policymaking

4-WSP

Examines the vision, structure, and functioning of the European Union, together with case studies of the policy process in various policy areas, as well as controversial issues unique to the EU. Liberal Arts.

POLS 344 Peacebuilding: Genocide and Religious Diversity

3-F&S

Students will study the ethnic conflicts of Rwanda as a means of learning issues in the healing of trauma (both personal and social) and the processes of building peace and establishing reconciliation. The history of Rwanda is important in understanding the basis of genocide. As students learn about the reconstruction process, they will discover the roles played by the state, church and nongovernmental organizations. Students will also consider the current social challenges brought on by the increasing presence of Islam in Rwanda and discuss the role of the international community both during the genocide and during the rebuilding process. Students will have the opportunity to interact with individuals who have experienced these human tragedies. Liberal Arts.

POLS 345 Community Organization and Development

4-WSP

A comparative study of how local communities organize themselves to manage natural resources and provide collective goods and sources, with a focus on developing countries. Considers issues related to decentralization and sustainable development. Emphasis on analytic approaches to problem-solving. Liberal Arts.

POLS 346 Governance and Development

4-S

A study of patterns of governance and politics typical of developing countries with an emphasis on relationships between governance and development. Liberal Arts.

POLS 353 War & Terrorism in the Middle East: History and Politics

4-WSP

This course explores three phenomena: (1) war and terrorism in general and in the Middle East in particular; (2) the history and politics of this region (with forays into geography, religion, society, culture, and economics); and (3) country-specific histories and politics. In-depth analysis of the religion-terrorism nexus, Arab-Israeli conflict and peacemaking, and the theory and practice of pacifism and just war. Liberal Arts.

POLS 355 East Asia: History and Politics

4-WSP

Introduction to history and politics of East Asia from ancient time to the present, with focus on China and Japan. Emphasis on historical and political developments in 19th and 20th centuries leading to founding of Communist China and the new Japan. Liberal Arts.

POLS 357 Russia and the USSR: History and Politics

4-WSP

Introduction to Russian and Soviet history and politics from first records to present, with focus on government, institutions, culture, and society of Imperial and Soviet periods. Liberal Arts.

POLS 362 Loyalty

4-WSP

Careful consideration of the meaning, origin, objects, and limits of loyalty, with special attention to its political manifestations. Draws on a wide range of philosophical, political, legal, theological, and literary sources. Liberal Arts.

POLS 364 The Roots of Conservatism

4-WSP

Examines the origins of contemporary conservatism in the thought of three influential early modern thinkers: Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, and David Hume. Comparisons throughout with contemporary versions of conservative thought. Liberal Arts.

POLS 366 Contemporary Political Thought

4-May

An introduction to a broad range of theoretical approaches within current Anglo-American political philosophy. Special focus on liberalism, communitarianism, multiculturalism, and feminism. Liberal Arts.

POLS 368 Aristotle

4-WSP

An introduction to fundamental political concepts by means of a careful study of the Ethics and Politics of Aristotle. Topics considered include the nature of political science, the relation between ethics and politics, community, justice, equality, law, constitutionalism, property, citizenship, conflict, institutional design, different regime types, the purposes of political life, and the relation between empirical and normative analysis. Liberal Arts.

POLS 375 Immigration and Citizenship

4-WSP

Course explores the question, what does it mean to be a member of a political community? And how does one become a member? Typically considers historical development of American immigration and citizenship policy; philosophical analyses of citizenship and the right of movement; problems of integration and diversity; comparative policy analysis; and the role of citizenship in a changing world. Liberal Arts.

POLS 393 Field Experience (Internship)

1, 2, 3, or 4-WSP

Supervised participation in executive, legislative, judicial, or legal offices in local, state, or federal government when deemed suitable for academic credit and approved by the political science advisor and the chair of the Department of History and Political Science. Usually four hours of credit may be counted toward the major or minor. May be combined with an additional four hours of credit for POLS 391 Independent Study. Liberal Arts.

POLS 425 Problems and Issues in American Politics

4-WSP

Focuses on specific problems and recurrent issues in the study of American politics, including concerns related to elections, representation, accountability, public law, governance, and the constitutional order at all levels of government. Topics vary. Includes a research or field component. Liberal Arts.

POLS 427 Constitutional Law I: Structures and Powers of Government

4-F

First half of the constitutional law sequence. Focuses on government structure and powers, including judicial review, the separation of powers, and federalism. May be taken independently of Constitutional Law II. Liberal Arts.

POLS 428 Constitutional Law II: Civil Rights and Liberties

4-S

Second half of the constitutional law sequence. Focuses on civil rights and liberties, especially issues dealing with the Bill of Rights and equal protection. Constitutional Law I is not a prerequisite. Liberal Arts.

POLS 429 Religion and the Constitution

4-S

Examines constitutional debates surrounding the “first freedom”, religious liberty. In the context of different theories of the proper relationship between church and state, we examine First Amendment cases involving the establishment and free exercise clauses, as well as relevant privacy issues such as abortion and euthanasia. Liberal Arts.

POLS 437 International Law and Organization

4-WSP

Introduces students to the fields of international law and international organization. Heavy emphasis on reading, analyzing, and briefing international law cases. Students examine issues of international organization from a number of theoretical perspectives, such as realism, liberal idealism, Marxism, and feminism. Liberal Arts.

POLS 468, 469 America and the World I, II

4-WSP

Exposes students to cutting-edge discussions of both the American polity and its role in world affairs by reading extremely current literature. Emphasis on the relation between normative theory and political practice. Topics considered include citizenship, American national identity, democracy, sovereignty, and globalization, but specific focus varies depending upon readings. Heavy reading load; emphasis on class discussion and student book reviews of material. Taught alternately as POLS 468 A&W I or POLS 469 A&W II, with a different reading list each time; students may take both 468 and 469 for credit. Liberal Arts.

POLS 480 Senior Capstone: Politics Seminar

4-S

Capstone course of the major in which students integrate concepts, knowledge, skills, methods, approaches, and practical experience in politics and government. Will improve research, writing, analytical, and communication skills by researching, writing, and defending a paper based on original research in both primary and secondary sources and similar in quality to what would be expected in the first year of graduate study. Liberal Arts.

POLS 496 Honors in Political Science

4-S

Liberal Arts.

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