A Christian College of the Liberal Arts & Sciences

Department of Off Campus Study Opportunites

view dept. website http://www.houghton.edu/academics/off-campus-programs/

Marcus W. Dean, Director

585.567.9634 | OCP@houghton.edu
Overview

Houghton College students have access to several unique opportunities as outlined in the academic information section earlier in the catalog. Some are operated entirely by Houghton College, others in cooperation with the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities or the Christian College Consortium. Houghton’s own opportunities are under the general direction of the academic dean and are staffed by faculty of various academic departments, as per the needs of each opportunity. More detailed information is available through the Off-Campus Opportunities Office located in the Chamberlain Center, Room 413.

Participating in an off-campus opportunity is an academic privilege that can enhance the student’s education. Because of the additional demands faced in the off-campus setting, students are required to have a 2.5 or higher GPA to participate in any off-campus opportunity. Several of Houghton's opportunities require a 2.75 GPA.

Consortium Visitor: Houghton has agreements with most of the other 12 colleges in the Christian College Consortium to allow single-semester visiting student status at another college. For information on the opportunities, requirements, and essential paperwork, contact to the Academic Records Office.

Honors Opportunities
Courses
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ANTH 256 History, Religion, & Society of the Mekong Region

3-F&S

This course provides an introduction of the historical and social context of the Mekong subregion of South East Asia and explores the dynamics between religious, political, and other social foundations and contemporary forces of change. The course begins with a survey of the major religions of the region (chiefly Buddhism and tribal Animism) and their enduring influence of worldview and culture. The course proceeds with a survey of regional history from ancient times (including the La Na kingdom, of particular significance to Chiang Mai’s heritage) through nation building and international relations to the emergence of globalization. Students will be guided to explore the influence of intangible factors on tangible institutions and historical events. The course includes several excursions to nearby sites and guest lectures to ground the knowledge of the Mekong region with an experiential sense of place and perspective. Liberal Arts.

ANTH 293 East African Cultures

4-S

Intensive study of East African ethnic groups – their beliefs, behaviors, work, societies. Lectures, which include foundational anthropological theory as well as ethnic descriptions, are augmented by observations and home stays amongst the Massai, Kelenjin, Murle, Hehe or other peoples. Sociology, Intercultural Studies elective credit. Houghton in Tanzania Program. Liberal Arts.

ANTH 340 African Traditional Culture and Religion

3-F&S

This course deals with an overview of African traditional cultures and religion (ATR) as well as the challenges African cultures pose to Christians in Africa. Topics to be covered will include: the concept of culture, social groupings, ATR, characteristics of ATR, sources of ATR, African world view, basic values, religious leaders, mystical forces, African religious experience, ethics, ethics and morality, death and hereafter. Attention will also be focused on some specific societies. The changes currently taking place today will also be considered. Liberal Arts.

ART 238 Art and Music in Australia and New Zealand

4-WSP

Art, architecture, and music in context in Australia and New Zealand. Examines the interaction of Western and indigenous cultural styles and the influence of local and national conditions on the arts. Readings, journal-keeping, and questions pertaining to site-specific works are required. Major credit: Intercultural Studies. Culture: Music or Art. Liberal Arts.

ART 348 Fine Arts of Southeastern Europe

4-WSP

Art history of Catholic southern Europe and especially of the Venetian Empire, principally painting and architecture. Comparison is made with the art and iconography of Orthodox Europe, especially of Serbia and Macedonia. Some study of Ottoman Muslim art during time in Bosnia. Houghton Balkans Semester Program. Culture: Art.

BIOL 207 Wildlife Behavior in East Africa

4-S

Ethnology of East African wildlife including the principles of feeding and social behavior, mate selection, migrations and communication. Lectures and two weeks of field observations at the Tanzania Field Station. Houghton in Tanzania Program. Creation: Lab science or 2nd science. Liberal Arts.

ENGL 345 Literatures of the Cultures of Central and Southeastern Europe

4-WSP

Introduction to and survey of the literatures of central, eastern and southeastern Europe including samples from Catholic, Orthodox, and Muslim cultures. The course will cover a selection of novels, essays, and poetry. Houghton Balkans Semester Program.

ENGL 390 ST: African Folk Lore

2-4-S

Africa has a rich heritage of oral literature. In recent years much of this has been recorded, translated and published. This course is primarily a reading course while in the African setting. Students will examine stories from many ethnic groups in genres such as etiological stories, trickster tales, myths and morality tales. The students will write short papers on each genre with a longer comprehensive term paper at the end of the course. Optional Houghton in Tanzania Program course. Liberal Arts.

HIST 341 Conceptualizing the City: An Exploration of the City in Western Culture

4-6-F&S

Explores the history of cities and the ideas that have shaped both their objective development – in terms of their material culture, their economic base, and their political structure – and our subjective experience of them. Also considers social science explanations of urban development (why cities?), 20th century trends (suburbanization, metropolitanization) and reactions to them, and ponders the future of cities in the 21st century. Reading ranges over works of history, philosophy, literary fiction, and social science. Throughout, connections to the Buffalo experience provide concrete (sometimes literally concrete) illustrations of ideas and their effects. Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

HIST 347 The Balkans and Eastern Europe: Early Middle Ages to Present

4-WSP

A survey of the history of Balkan and Eastern European history with special emphasis upon the interactions of Catholic, Orthodox, and Muslim cultures; ethnic and religious diversity; the fraught relationship with western Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment ideas; and mutually exclusive nationalist interpretations. Houghton Balkans Semester Program.

INCL 238 Art and Music in Australia and New Zealand

4-WSP

Art, architecture, and music in context in Australia and New Zealand. Examines the interaction of Western and indigenous cultural styles and the influence of local and national conditions on the arts. Readings, journal-keeping, and questions pertaining to site-specific works are required. Major credit: Intercultural Studies. Culture: Music or Art. Liberal Arts.

INCL 255 Thai Cultural Arts

3-F&S

This course explores the Thai arts as both cultural expression and cultural epistemology (a way of engaging and knowing the world that differs from Western empiricism and consumerism). It provides hands on experience of the ways in which the arts can serve as an agent of preservation as well as an agent of transformation in culture. It seeks to guide students in the exploration of the spiritual, philosophical, social, and psychological drivers of the cultural arts in order to gain a deeper appreciation of diversity and human creativity. Students will be introduced to a broad array of artistic expression and media in Thailand under the guidance of local experts and artists (including visual arts, music, hand crafts, culinary arts, dance, Likay, and other performing arts). Students will come to appreciate the unique role and effectiveness of the arts in culture (e.g. prophetic confrontation of injustice with the status quo, or communicating in ways that overcome linguistic barriers, etc.) and gain a new sense of value of the arts for their life and work. The course has a high emphasis on participation and reflection. Culture: Art. Liberal Arts.

INCL 256 History, Religion, & Society of the Mekong Region

3-F&S

This course provides an introduction of the historical and social context of the Mekong subregion of South East Asia and explores the dynamics between religious, political, and other social foundations and contemporary forces of change. The course begins with a survey of the major religions of the region (chiefly Buddhism and tribal Animism) and their enduring influence of worldview and culture. The course proceeds with a survey of regional history from ancient times (including the La Na kingdom, of particular significance to Chiang Mai’s heritage) through nation building and international relations to the emergence of globalization. Students will be guided to explore the influence of intangible factors on tangible institutions and historical events. The course includes several excursions to nearby sites and guest lectures to ground the knowledge of the Mekong region with an experiential sense of place and perspective. Liberal Arts.

INCL 301 Engaging Australian and New Zealand Culture

4-WSP

Reading history, literature, and cultural analysis of the various cultures of Australia and New Zealand will combine with relating to locales and people through study, discussion, and service projects. Incorporates travel, homestays, and involvement in local cultural activities. Liberal Arts.

INCL 314 Exclusion and Exploitation: Marginal people of the Mekong

3-F&S

This course examines the exclusion and exploitation of people in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS). Topics to be covered include: Identifying the various groups of people who are marginalized in the GMS and the basis of their exclusion (including race, ethnicity, nationality, citizenship, gender, religion, economic status, and other factors); Describing the types of injustice faced (including poverty, human rights violations, discrimination, prejudice, genocide, persecution, labor exploitation, trafficking, prostitution, forced migration of IDPs, refugees and economic refugees); Examining the history, context and causes of exclusion and exploitation; and analyzing indigenous, governmental, NGO, and faith-based responses. Liberal Arts.

INCL 319 Cross- Cultural Field Practicum

3-F&S

This course in the Go ED opportunity is described as providing "hands on" cross-cultural experience with community development work in the field. Students will be exposed to international development programs and have the opportunity to work in cross-cultural work environments and contribute meaningfully to their assigned program. Students will begin to assess their own ability to live and work in cross-cultural settings as well as be introduced to the challenges faced in the Millennial Development Goals. Potential sites include Thailand, Cambodia, Bangladesh, the Philippines, and other South East Asian countries. Can substitute for INCL 311 for INCL majors/minors and ICE with INCL concentration. Liberal Arts.

INCL 328 Community and Society in Australia and New Zealand

4-WSP

Examines social institutions in urban Australia and New Zealand. Analyzes social problems and institutional and community responses by churches and faith-based organizations, and compares them with those of governments, non-government organizations and prosocial community organizations. Major/minor credit: ministry, missions, urban ministry, psychology, sociology. Community: Psychology or Sociology. Liberal Arts.

INCL 329 Australia and New Zealand Culture through Film

4-WSP

Since creating the first feature-length film in the world, Australian film-makers have examined themselves, their culture, their environment, and their interactions with the rest of the world in varied and distinctive ways, often with a gloss of revealing humor. Through the films studied in this class, students will be introduced to the diversity of Australia and New Zealand culture, from pre-historical aboriginal and Maori to postmodern. Major credit: Intercultural Studies, Psychology, Sociology. Community: Psychology or Sociology. Liberal Arts.

INCL 340 African Traditional Culture and Religion

3-F&S

This course deals with an overview of African traditional cultures and religion (ATR) as well as the challenges African cultures pose to Christians in Africa. Topics to be covered will include: the concept of culture, social groupings, ATR, characteristics of ATR, sources of ATR, African world view, basic values, religious leaders, mystical forces, African religious experience, ethics, ethics and morality, death and hereafter. Attention will also be focused on some specific societies. The changes currently taking place today will also be considered. Liberal Arts.

INCL 345 Peacebuilding: Genocide and Religious Diversity

3-F&S

Students will study the ethnic conflicts of Rwanda as a means of learning issues in the healing of trauma (both personal and social) and the processes of building peace and establishing reconciliation. The history of Rwanda is important in understanding the basis of genocide. As students learn about the reconstruction process, they will discover the roles played by the state, church and nongovernmental organizations. Students will also consider the current social challenges brought on by the increasing presence of Islam in Rwanda and discuss the role of the international community both during the genocide and during the rebuilding process. Students will have the opportunity to interact with individuals who have experienced these human tragedies. Liberal Arts.

INCL 381 Social Context for Community Development

3-F&S

This course is an introduction to development and development theory. Students will acquire knowledge of and the ability to apply a variety of development strategies and methods. During the field component of the course students will be exposed to programming and sites where they will be able to apply the content material for assessing and recommending program alterations within the context of specific communities. Students will become acquainted with the Millennial Development Goals and their relevance to the area situations. Students will be exposed to a variety of strategies designed to involve members of the community in the process of development. Strategies for funding community development projects locally and internationally are explored. Liberal Arts.

INCL 381 Social Context for Community Development

3-F&S

This course is an introduction to development and development theory. Students will acquire knowledge of and the ability to apply a variety of development strategies and methods. During the field component of the course students will be exposed to programming and sites where they will be able to apply the content material for assessing and recommending program alterations within the context of specific communities. Students will become acquainted with the Millennial Development Goals and their relevance to area situations. Students will be exposed to a variety of strategies designed to involve members of the community in the process of development. Strategies for funding community development projects locally and internationally are explored. Liberal Arts.

INTS 275 Engaging Urban Culture

1-F&S

Students will explore some aspects of urban culture. Meetings will be held every other week in a setting outside of the classroom. This course provides academic structure for engagement that will help students to experience, explore, and understand the complex diversity of Buffalo and to foster reflection on our place in a diverse world. Events will be planned that explore features of urban culture, such as history, architecture, music, the visual and dramatic arts, and other aspects of Buffalo and its subcultures. [a lab or activity fee may be charged] Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

MIN 325 Life in the City

3-WSP

The theme of urban life and mission as related to the sociology and psychology of the city is developed, focusing on life and ministry in the complexity and diversity of New York State’s second largest city. Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

MIN 328 Community and Society in Australia and New Zealand

4-WSP

Examines social institutions in urban Australia and New Zealand. Analyzes social problems and institutional and community responses by churches and faith-based organizations, and compares them with those of governments, non-government organizations and prosocial community organizations. Major/minor credit: ministry, missions, urban ministry, psychology, sociology. Community: Psychology or Sociology. Liberal Arts.

MISS 325 Life in the City

3-WSP

The theme of urban life and mission as related to the sociology and psychology of the city is developed, focusing on life and ministry in the complexity and diversity of New York State’s second largest city. Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

MISS 328 Community and Society in Australia and New Zealand

4-WSP

Examines social institutions in urban Australia and New Zealand. Analyzes social problems and institutional and community responses by churches and faith-based organizations, and compares them with those of governments, non-government organizations and prosocial community organizations. Major/minor credit: ministry, missions, urban ministry, psychology, sociology. Community: Psychology or Sociology. Liberal Arts.

MISS 395 ST: Missions in Africa

2-4-WSP

The Gospel in East Africa. Exploration of the receptivity of African Christians to the Gospel from first hand encounter with African Christians and church leaders. Analysis of traditions, practice, forms and experiences. Also, an examination of strategies for furthering the Gospel including varieties of missionary methods. First hand contact with numerous missionary efforts. Clear view of the impact of Christianity and the ongoing challenges in East Africa. Missions, Intercultural Studies or elective credits. Prerequisite: previous course work in missions or permission of instructor. Optional Houghton in Tanzania Program course.

POLS 341 Conceptualizing the City: An Exploration of the City in Western Culture

4-6-F&S

Explores the history of cities and the ideas that have shaped both their objective development – in terms of their material culture, their economic base, and their political structure – and our subjective experience of them. Also considers social science explanations of urban development (why cities?), 20th century trends (suburbanization, metropolitanization) and reactions to them, and ponders the future of cities in the 21st century. Reading ranges over works of history, philosophy, literary fiction, and social science. Throughout, connections to the Buffalo experience provide concrete (sometimes literally concrete) illustrations of ideas and their effects. Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

POLS 344 Peacebuilding: Genocide and Religious Diversity

3-F&S

Students will study the ethnic conflicts of Rwanda as a means of learning issues in the healing of trauma (both personal and social) and the processes of building peace and establishing reconciliation. The history of Rwanda is important in understanding the basis of genocide. As students learn about the reconstruction process, they will discover the roles played by the state, church and nongovernmental organizations. Students will also consider the current social challenges brought on by the increasing presence of Islam in Rwanda and discuss the role of the international community both during the genocide and during the rebuilding process. Students will have the opportunity to interact with individuals who have experienced these human tragedies. Liberal Arts.

PSY 324 Life in the City

3-WSP

The theme of urban life and mission as related to the sociology and psychology of the city is developed, focusing on life and ministry in the complexity and diversity of New York State’s second largest city. Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

PSY 328 Community and Society in Australia and New Zealand

4-WSP

Examines social institutions in urban Australia and New Zealand. Analyzes social problems and institutional and community responses by churches and faith-based organizations, and compares them with those of governments, non-government organizations and prosocial community organizations. Major/minor credit: ministry, missions, urban ministry, psychology, sociology. Community: Psychology or Sociology. Liberal Arts.

PSY 329 Australia and New Zealand Culture through Film

4-WSP

Since creating the first feature-length film in the world, Australian film-makers have examined themselves, their culture, their environment, and their interactions with the rest of the world in varied and distinctive ways, often with a gloss of revealing humor. Through the films studied in this class, students will be introduced to the diversity of Australia and New Zealand culture, from pre-historical aboriginal and Maori to postmodern. Major credit: Intercultural Studies, Psychology, Sociology. Community: Psychology or Sociology. Liberal Arts.

SOC 293 East African Cultures

4-S

Intensive study of East African ethnic groups – their beliefs, behaviors, work, societies. Lectures, which include foundational anthropological theory as well as ethnic descriptions, are augmented by observations and home stays amongst the Massai, Kelenjin, Murle, Hehe or other peoples. Sociology, Intercultural Studies elective credit. Houghton in Tanzania Program. Liberal Arts.

SOC 325 Life in the City

3-WSP

The theme of urban life and mission as related to the sociology and psychology of the city is developed, focusing on life and ministry in the complexity and diversity of New York State’s second largest city. Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

SOC 328 Community and Society in Australia and New Zealand

4-WSP

Examines social institutions in urban Australia and New Zealand. Analyzes social problems and institutional and community responses by churches and faith-based organizations, and compares them with those of governments, non-government organizations and prosocial community organizations. Major/minor credit: ministry, missions, urban ministry, psychology, sociology. Community: Psychology or Sociology. Liberal Arts.

SOC 329 Australia and New Zealand Culture through Film

4-WSP

Since creating the first feature-length film in the world, Australian film-makers have examined themselves, their culture, their environment, and their interactions with the rest of the world in varied and distinctive ways, often with a gloss of revealing humor. Through the films studied in this class, students will be introduced to the diversity of Australia and New Zealand culture, from pre-historical aboriginal and Maori to postmodern. Major credit: Intercultural Studies, Psychology, Sociology. Community: Psychology or Sociology. Liberal Arts.

THEL 346 Elements of Catholic, Muslim and Orthodox Theology

4-F

An examination of the development of Catholic and Orthodox theology and practices from the early Middle Ages with a particular emphasis upon major figures, and differences between the traditions. An introduction will be given to Islam with particular attention paid to Christian-Muslim interaction from the seventh century through to modern times and to syncretistic folk religion, the dervish, etc. Houghton Balkans Semester Program.

Prerequisite Courses: THEL 209

URMN 325 Life in the City

3-WSP

The theme of urban life and mission as related to the sociology and psychology of the city is developed, focusing on life and ministry in the complexity and diversity of New York State’s second largest city. Houghton College City Semester program. Liberal Arts.

URMN 328 Community and Society in Australia and New Zealand

4-WSP

Examines social institutions in urban Australia and New Zealand. Analyzes social problems and institutional and community responses by churches and faith-based organizations, and compares them with those of governments, non-government organizations and prosocial community organizations. Major/minor credit: ministry, missions, urban ministry, psychology, sociology. Community: Psychology or Sociology. Liberal Arts.

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