Why Counseling?

Why Counseling?

Students seek counseling for several reasons including high stress levels, loneliness, depressed or sad mood, lack of concentration, poor eating habits, difficulty adjusting to new surroundings, relationship problems, and worries about all of these and other things!
Very often, students just need a place to safely vent frustrations, talk about their concerns, and seek guidance for their continued well-being and emotional growth.

There is no longer a stigma about someone who seeks “counseling.” In fact, slightly more than one in five students at Houghton College are seen in counseling each year.

Students who leave counseling are asked to complete a brief “evaluation” form. Collectively, these forms provide us with valuable information about our services, and help us decide direction for our programming.

Student Feedback

The following are comments from students taken from the “Counseling Evaluations,” responding to the question: “What was the thing you liked most about your experience with counseling?”

  • “I wasn’t just another student. I was considered a friend. I especially appreciated the support outside of the office. It sets a good example and provides a good role model.”
  • “Being able to talk freely…not being interrupted, but being heard, and knowing the counselor was flexible and would adapt to meet my needs.”
  • “The encouragement to work through my problems. I was reassured I was on the ‘right track’…this was especially helpful, and was also able to see how I grew from the first appointment.  I still fall back on practices and advice given during my sessions”
  • “I felt like I was burdening my friends with my problems.  But in counseling I could talk to someone who knew how to help me grow, and to see things from a healthy Christian viewpoint. I am changing my own attitudes and behaviors to be more Christ-like.”
  • “I came in with a crisis and it was worked out for me to see someone right away.”
  • “My decision not to continue counseling was respected…I was in charge of when I was finished…I didn’t feel obligated to continue once I began.”